Pumpkin Nutrition Facts

Pumpkins are packed with phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. They are high in vital antioxidants, especially alpha and beta carotenes. Plus, they contain vitamin A, vitamin B-complex, vitamin C, vitamin E, iron, zinc, magnesium, potassium, etc.

Even pumpkin seeds have immense nutritional value as they are rich in protein and omega-3 fatty acids. They also contain a compound called L-tryptophan that alleviates depression.

Moreover, the protein in the rind can inhibit the growth of fungi causing yeast infections. Besides, this low-calorie fruit with high water content is a good source of dietary fiber and does not contain saturated fats.

PumpkinThis squash-like fruit is often consumed as cooked vegetable. Furthermore, you can use raw as well as canned pumpkins.

In fact, you can add canned pumpkins in soups, breads, muffins, puddings, pies, and other baked goods. Pumpkin recipes are particularly popular for Halloween and Thanksgiving.

It is interesting to note that apart from pumpkin flesh and seeds, you can also consume pumpkin leaves and flowers.

Raw Pumpkin Nutritional Value

Value per 100 g Value in a cup (116 g) % Daily Value (for 100 g) % Daily Value (for 116 g)
Energy

26 kcal

30 kcal

1.30%

1.50%

Carbohydrate

6.5 g

7.54 g

2.16%

2.51%

Protein

1 g

1.16 g

2.00%

2.32%

Total Fat

0.1 g

0.12 g

0.15%

0.18%

Saturated Fats

0.052 g

0.06 g

0.26%

0.30%

Monounsaturated Fats

0.013 g

0.015 g

0.05%

0.06%

Polyunsaturated Fats

0.005 g

0.006 g

0.02%

0.03%

Cholesterol

0 mg

0 mg

0.00%

0.00%

Dietary Fiber

0.5 g

0.6 g

2.00%

2.40%

Total Sugar

2.76 g

3.2 g

Water

91.6 g

106.26 g

Ash

0.8 g

0.93 g

Vitamins

Vitamin A IU

8513 IU

9875 IU

170.26%

197.5%

Retinol

0 µg

0 µg

Beta Carotene

3100 µg

3596 µg

Vitamin B1- thiamin

0.05 mg

0.058 mg

3.33%

3.86%

Vitamin B2- riboflavin

0.11 mg

0.128 mg

6.47%

7.53%

Vitamin B3- niacin

0.6 mg

0.696 mg

3.00%

3.48%

Vitamin B6

0.061 mg

0.071 mg

3.05%

3.55%

Vitamin B12

0 mg

0 mg

0.00%

0.00%

Vitamin C

9 mg

10.4 mg

15.00%

17.33%

Vitamin D

0 IU

0 IU

0.00%

0.00%

Vitamin E

1.06 mg

1.23 mg

5.3%

6.15%

Folic acid

0 µg

0 µg

0.00%

0.00%

Folate

16 µg

19 µg

4.00%

4.75%

Pantothenic acid

0.298 mg

0.346 mg

2.98%

3.46%

Choline

8.2 mg

9.5 mg

Vitamin K

1.1 µg

1.3 µg

1.38%

1.63%

Minerals

Calcium

21 mg

24 mg

2.10%

2.40%

Copper

0.127 mg

0.147 mg

6.35%

7.35%

Iron

0.8 mg

0.93 mg

4.44%

5.16%

Magnesium

12 mg

14 mg

3.00%

3.50%

Manganese

0.125 mg

0.145 mg

6.25%

7.25%

Phosphorus

44 mg

51 mg

4.40%

5.10%

Potassium

340 mg

394 mg

Selenium

0.3 µg

0.3 µg

0.43%

0.43%

Sodium

1 mg

1 mg

Zinc

0.32 mg

0.37 mg

2.13%

2.46%

Phytosterols

12 mg

14 mg

Source: USDA Nutrient Database. Daily Values based on a 2000 Calorie diet

Pumpkin Health Benefits

Being rich in beta carotenes, pumpkins can help reduce the chances of developing heart disease and delay aging.

Furthermore, the carotenoids present in common large pumpkins strengthen the immune system, protect against certain types of cancers like that of bladder, colon, skin, breast, etc., and decrease the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts.

This fruit supports the kidney and bladder (prevents the formation of kidney stones). In addition, it improves digestive health, lowers blood cholesterolreduces hypertension, and prevents osteoporosis.

Plus, it is good for those suffering from diabetes because it has hypoglycemic substances. It boosts the insulin levels and lowers high blood sugar levels.

Moreover, pumpkin seed oil and tea are useful in the treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, enlarged prostate, cystitis, and urinary tract infection.

Besides, the fruit has antioxidant and mild anti-inflammatory properties. Pumpkin seed oil contains linoleic acid, which improves brain function, and gives you healthy skin and hair. In addition, consuming a teaspoon of this oil three times in a day can reduce hair loss and male pattern baldness.

Additional Information and Tips

It is best to buy whole pumpkins rather than sections of the fruit. If you need a pumpkin for cooking, then pick a small to medium sized “sweet pumpkin” or “pie pumpkin” as it is smoother and less stringy. It should be firm and heavy for its size.

Avoid choosing a pumpkin with wrinkled skin. Plus, the stem should be at least an inch long; the ones with stems cut down tend to decay soon. Needless to say, do not select the ones with soft spots, cracks, and blemishes.

As for storage, you can store it at room temperature in a cool and well-ventilated place for several weeks, up to two months.

Cut sections, however, should be wrapped in a paper towel or greaseproof paper, stored in the refrigerator and used within a few days. Preferably, remove the skin and seeds before storing in the refrigerator.

When cutting the fruit, you can remove the stem and then slice the fruit into two halves with the help of a sharp knife. Next, scoop out the seeds and fibers, and cut the fruit as you desire.

Make sure you wash the fruit beforehand. To separate the seeds from the pulp, you can rinse the seeds in cold water. You may roast the seeds and eat as a healthy snack. You can find hulled or semi-hulled pumpkin seeds at grocery stores.

Side Effects

Though rare still, pumpkins may cause allergic reactions in children. Besides, although pumpkin seeds are fit for consumption yet taking large amounts of pumpkin seeds may cause an upset stomach and stomach ache.

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